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Today — 21 April 2024Main stream

New RedLine Stealer Variant Disguised as Game Cheats Using Lua Bytecode for Stealth

By: Newsroom
21 April 2024 at 04:42
A new information stealer has been found leveraging Lua bytecode for added stealth and sophistication, findings from McAfee Labs reveal. The cybersecurity firm has assessed it to be a variant of a known malware called RedLine Stealer owing to the fact that the command-and-control (C2) server IP address has been previously identified as associated with the malware. RedLine Stealer,&nbsp

Gibson Les Paul Standard '60s Faded Electric Guitar (Vintage Cherry Sunburst) $1856 + Free Shipping

21 April 2024 at 02:09
Gibson Les Paul Standard '60s Faded Electric Guitar (Vintage Cherry Sunburst) $1856 + Free Shipping

Thumb Score: +12
Sam Ash has Gibson Les Paul Standard '60s Faded Electric Guitar (Vintage Cherry Sunburst) on sale for $1856.44 when you select the Factory Setup option on the page, add to cart and apply promo code FAM in your cart. Shipping is free.[LIST][*]Note: This is a New Item that is on display at a Sam Ash store, their experts will inspect the item before shipment.

NEXPOW 4K Dash Cam Front & 1080p Rear w/ Built-in GPS $40 + Free Shipping

21 April 2024 at 00:28
NEXPOW 4K Dash Cam Front & 1080p Rear w/ Built-in GPS $40 + Free Shipping

Thumb Score: +24
AUTO Direct Walmart has NEXPOW 4K Dash Cam Front & 1080p Rear w/ Built-in GPS (VS100-XCJLY-DS/Wal) on sale for $49.99 - $10 off when you 'clip' the coupon on the product page = $39.99. Shipping is free.

Thanks to Staff Member LovelyCheetah for sharing this deal.

About this product:

Chinese Grand Prix: F1 – live

21 April 2024 at 02:44

A bit of minor surgery is being carried out on the floor of Fernando Alonso’s car. Nothing major, by the likes, but can be a bit concerning. The Spaniard starts third on the grid and will fancy this.

The general pre-race prognosis is that this is likely to be a two-stop race. The weather is overcast but dry.

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© Photograph: Andy Wong/AP

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© Photograph: Andy Wong/AP

Left silences right, right silences left. But censorship stops us pushing for change | Kenan Malik

21 April 2024 at 02:30

In Brussels and Berlin, flimsy excuses were trotted out to stifle political debate

Two conferences in two European cities. Two attempted bans (though only one successful). Two different responses from politicians and the media. All of which tells us something about the state of free speech today.

Last Tuesday, Emir Kir, a mayor in Brussels, created international headlines when he tried to ban a National Conservative conference in the city. The attempt failed, denounced as “unacceptable” by the Belgian prime minister, Alexander de Croo, and ruled unlawful by the top administrative court.

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© Photograph: Dimitris Aspiotis/REX/Shutterstock

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© Photograph: Dimitris Aspiotis/REX/Shutterstock

Alarm at growing number of working people in UK ‘struggling to make ends meet’

21 April 2024 at 02:00

UK debt advice charity warns that cost of living crisis and higher rents are pushing younger full-time workers into difficulties

A rising number of people in full-time work, including those in jobs such as nursing, have been seeking advice on debt, amid warnings that a growing cohort of younger workers is struggling to make ends meet.

Figures seen by the Observer suggest rising rents and the use of credit to cope with the cost of living crisis in recent years are driving more full-time workers to seek help.

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© Photograph: Christopher Thomond/The Guardian

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© Photograph: Christopher Thomond/The Guardian

Sex offender banned from using AI tools in landmark UK case

The decision could set a precedent for future monitoring of people convicted of indecent image offences

A sex offender convicted of making more than 1,000 indecent images of children has been banned from using any “AI creating tools” for the next five years in the first known case of its kind.

Anthony Dover, 48, was ordered by a UK court “not to use, visit or access” artificial intelligence generation tools without the prior permission of police as a condition of a sexual harm prevention order imposed in February.

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© Photograph: Dominic Lipinski/PA

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© Photograph: Dominic Lipinski/PA

Thousands of children strip-searched by police in England and Wales last year

More than 60 under-18s a week were subjected to intrusive searches, some of them as young as 10

More than 60 children a week are being strip-searched by police in England and Wales, with those who are black, Asian or mixed race significantly more likely to be targeted, new figures reveal.

Data from 41 out of 43 police forces shows that 3,122 searches were carried out on under 18s in the year to March 2023. In total, 68,874 strip searches were carried out.

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© Photograph: Sabrina Merolla/ZUMA Press Wire/REX/Shutterstock

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© Photograph: Sabrina Merolla/ZUMA Press Wire/REX/Shutterstock

Barbie, Bridgerton and billions of pounds: how streaming – and tax breaks – fuelled the UK’s ‘Brollywood’ screen boom

21 April 2024 at 02:00

Great locations, experienced crews and juicy incentives have made UK studios increasingly attractive, and brought Hollywood stars to the unlikeliest locations. But with budgets falling and a lack of skills training, could the bubble be about to burst?

When Peter Vardy joined Calderdale council 46 years ago, his job mostly involved maintaining local parks and, later, organising the occasional firework display. But these days Vardy’s CV can truthfully boast that he has shut down roads to stage car crashes and found the perfect bridge for a fictional detective’s (fictional) suicide. The West Yorkshire borough where the 64-year-old works has become a filming hotspot, home to big-budget productions such as the Disney+ superhero series Secret Invasion and the Paramount Plus period drama A Gentleman in Moscow. Residents have spotted Hollywood stars relaxing in local restaurants – Samuel L Jackson is apparently partial to fried seafood, lemonade and tiramisu.

Since 2013, Vardy has acted as the council’s film officer; he manages applications for shoots, which back then were “few and far between”. A decade on, 2023 saw a total of 31 productions and 100 days of filming – partly because the BBC’s Happy Valley put Calderdale on the map in 2014, but largely because Hollywood has a new home. Generous tax breaks, the rise of streaming services and an ever-increasing demand for high-end TV have suddenly collided to make the UK a very attractive place to film.

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© Composite: Obsever Design/Alamy, FilmMagic, Getty, Paramount+, Netflix

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© Composite: Obsever Design/Alamy, FilmMagic, Getty, Paramount+, Netflix

Lyme Regis: a real taste of the Dorset coast with an exciting new food scene

By: Emma Cook
21 April 2024 at 02:00

A thriving artisan quarter and inventive restaurants have injected new life into this genteel seaside town famed for its fossils and literary haunts

Lyme Regis’s charms have always been resolutely genteel and old-fashioned, from its sedate regency seafront to its fondness for fossil shops and all things antique and literary.

It is a seaside town that has never felt the need to play to the hipster crowd, thanks partly to such distinguished and familiar history: home to 19th-century palaeontologist Mary Anning; John Fowles lived here, immortalising the Cobb breakwater in The French Lieutenant’s Woman; Jane Austen loved the place, giving it a starring role in one of Persuasion’s most memorable scenes; and Turner and Whistler both painted here.

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© Photograph: Julian Elliott Photography/Getty Images

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© Photograph: Julian Elliott Photography/Getty Images

The big picture: Gueorgui Pinkhassov’s shadow play in a 90s Tokyo hotel

By: Tim Adams
21 April 2024 at 02:00

The Russian Magnum photographer’s work celebrates the abstract side of vision, with a vivid exchange of form, light and pattern

In an exchange with a student in 2015, the Russian photographer Gueorgui Pinkhassov said that one goal of taking pictures was to “transform everything into form”. His experience, he suggested, showed that the more “irresponsibly” a photographer approached the high seriousness of getting a good picture, the more likely they were to succeed. He referenced something that the French poet Paul Valéry wrote in 1894: “Most people see with their intellects much more often than with their eyes. Instead of coloured spaces, they become aware of concepts.”

Pinkhassov, mentored in Russia by the film-maker Andrei Tarkovsky, was elected to the Magnum agency in 1988, just before the collapse of the Soviet Union. He put his philosophy of concentrating on “coloured spaces” into practice in his 1998 book Sightwalk, a collection of photographs from the streets of Tokyo. This image from that book, taken in a hotel in the city – and included in the forthcoming Magnum square print sale – reflected all of his thinking about framing and light. Our minds may want to reduce the scene to a mundane idea of hotel foyers, but our eyes are thrilled by the patterns of shadow.

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© Photograph: Gueorgui PINKHASSOV/MAGNUM PHOTOS

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© Photograph: Gueorgui PINKHASSOV/MAGNUM PHOTOS

David Cameron is making great strides. No, he really is, you can watch them on video | Catherine Bennett

21 April 2024 at 02:00

The foreign secretary’s actions are always ‘the right thing to do’. How marvellous!

Trotters up, or down? Even if you once admired Danny Dyer’s immortal summary of post-Brexit David Cameron – “He’s in Europe, in Nice, with his trotters up” – there’s a strong case for wishing he’d stayed that way.

When Cameron’s trotters were up, we were at least spared the surely more distressing spectacle of his trotters blithely ascending the moral high ground. When he was in Nice he wasn’t travelling the world and, with all the authority of a man who used to press the services of Lex Greensill on his former colleagues, educating it on his old speciality, “the right thing to do”.

Do you have an opinion on the issues raised in this article? If you would like to submit a letter of up to 250 words to be considered for publication, email it to us at observer.letters@observer.co.uk

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© Photograph: unknown

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© Photograph: unknown

Knife by Salman Rushdie review – a life interrupted

21 April 2024 at 02:00

While the author’s account of the 2022 murder attempt is a courageous defence of free speech, it is also shot through with self-regard, making it a sometimes hard book to admire

Twelve weeks after the knife attack that almost killed him on 12 August 2022, Salman Rushdie returned to his home in New York. One miracle duly following another, he was fairly soon out and about again: eating (tentatively) and drinking, and generally amazing everyone with his corporeal presence. At a dinner party in Brooklyn, for instance, he saw his old friend Martin Amis, who was then dying of cancer. After this meeting, which would be their last, Amis apparently sent Rushdie an email “so laudatory that I can’t reproduce it all”. What he will tell us, however, is that having expected his fellow writer to be altered, even diminished, by his trauma, Amis was struck by his intactness. Rushdie was, he wrote, entire: “And I thought with amazement, He’s EQUAL to it.”

In his extraordinary new book about the attempt on his life, Rushdie acknowledges that this statement may not have been true – and he’s right, of course. We are no match for horror and violence, just as we’re no match for cancer or any other illness. Such things may only be endured; a body responds (or not) to whatever treatment is available. But in another way, Amis wasn’t wrong. For all that Knife is unsparing of grisly details – when Rushdie describes the initial state of the eye that he lost to his would-be assassin’s blade, lolling on his cheek like “a large soft-boiled egg”, I had to close my eyes for a few moments – what has stayed with me since I finished it has relatively little to do with its author’s flesh and bones. On the page, this could not be anyone but Rushdie. In spirit, he really is, yes, unchanged. The writing is as good as it has ever been, and also (sometimes) as bad. If he appears before us as a courageous person, a true hero of free speech, he is still a bit of a snob and a show-off. The amour propre that was often on display in Joseph Anton, his 2012 memoir of the years when he was in hiding, has not gone away, though perhaps I’m more willing to forgive it now.

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© Photograph: Rachel Eliza Griffiths

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© Photograph: Rachel Eliza Griffiths

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